FBI Traces $41 Million Cryptocurrency Theft From Stake.com to Lazarus Group

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) says it has confirmed that North Korea’s Lazarus Group was behind the crypto theft of about $41 million from online crypto casino and sports betting platform Stake.com. The FBI has provided a number of Bitcoin, Ethereum, Binance Smart Chain (BSC), and Polygon addresses that received stolen funds from Stake.com.

FBI Attributes $41M Crypto Theft to Lazarus Group From DPRK

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) announced Wednesday that it has identified Lazarus Group’s cyber actors as responsible for the theft of approximately $41 million in cryptocurrency from Stake.com. The announcement states:

The FBI is issuing this release to warn the public regarding the theft of approximately $41 million in virtual currency from Stake.com, an online casino and betting platform. The FBI has confirmed that this theft took place on or about September 4, 2023, and attributes it to the Lazarus Group (also known as APT38) which is comprised of DPRK cyber actors.

The FBI also provided Bitcoin, Ethereum, Binance Smart Chain (BSC), and Polygon wallet addresses to which DPRK cyber actors purportedly transferred the stolen cryptocurrencies from Stake.com.

The FBI noted that the same DPRK cyber actors are also responsible for several other high-profile international crypto heists, adding that in 2023 alone, DPRK cyber actors have stolen more than $200 million. “This amount includes, but is not limited to, approximately $60 million of virtual currency from Alphapo and Coinspaid on or about July 22, 2023, and approximately $100 million of virtual currency from Atomic Wallet on or about June 2, 2023,” the Bureau detailed.

Moreover, the FBI advised: “Private sector entities are encouraged to review the previously released Cyber Security Advisory on Tradertraitor and examine the blockchain data associated with the above-referenced virtual currency addresses and be vigilant in guarding against transactions directly with, or derived from, those addresses.”

What do you think about Lazarus Group being behind Stake.com’s crypto theft? Let us know in the comments section below.

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